Michael Barry
Michael Barry, Ph.D., P.E., CFEI
Senior Engineer
Thermal Sciences
  • Natick

Dr. Barry specializes in the experimental analysis of fluid flow systems, including bio-fluids, fluid-structure interactions, and microscale flows. He possesses expertise in fluid mechanics, heat transfer, and thermodynamics, and he has applied this expertise to projects involving Li-ion battery failures, testing of consumer products, and intellectual property matters. Dr. Barry’s battery work has focused on the structural integrity of cell can assemblies, and his consumer products work has centered around stability of products in different thermal and chemical environments. His intellectual property work is varied and has involved issues such as fluid flow in toys and the fire safety properties of building materials.

Dr. Barry has experience with a range of experimental techniques including particle image velocimetry, digital holography, particle segmentation and tracking, and the design and fabrication of microfluidic devices. Dr. Barry has applied these skills to examining the interaction of swimming microorganisms with fluid flow and solid surfaces as related to applications in both natural environments and bioreactors. He has significant experience conducting numerical simulations of these microswimmers in different fluid environments. Dr. Barry also has extensive experience designing large, commercial heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems.

Prior to joining Exponent, Dr. Barry was a graduate research assistant in the Environmental Microfluidics Laboratory in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where his research was supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship. Prior to his work at MIT, Dr. Barry worked as an eighth grade mathematics teacher in Brooklyn, New York as a member of the New York City Teaching Fellows. Prior to that, he designed HVAC systems for large commercial buildings at Jaros, Baum, and Bolles in New York City. Dr. Barry has also been a mechanical and aerospace engineering fellow at Rutgers University, where he designed and fabricated a dynamic, scaled model of the human vocal folds and conducted studies on the fluid flow through those organs.

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), 2014
  • M.S., Mechanical Engineering, Rutgers University, 2005
  • M.S., Teaching, Pace University, 2008
  • B.S., Mechanical Engineering, Rutgers University, 2004
  • B.A., English, Rutgers University, 2004
  • National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, 2009–2012

LICENSES & CERTIFICATIONS

Licensed Mechanical Engineer, California, #38065

Certified Fire and Explosion Investigator

40 Hour HAZWOPER certified

Blasting Certificate of Competency, Massachusetts, #BL-007235

Publications

Barry MT. Shear-induced orientational dynamics and spatial heterogeneity in suspensions of motile phytoplankton. Journal of the Royal Society Interface 2015; 12(112).

Barry M. Mechanisms of reorientation in phytoplankton: fluid shear, surface interactions, and gravitaxis. Ph.D. Thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 2014.

Molaei M, Barry M, Stocker R, Sheng J. Failed Escape: Solid Surfaces Prevent Tumbling of Escherichia coli. Physical Review Letters 2014; 113:068103.

De Lillo F, Cencini M, Durham WM, Barry M, Stocker R, Climent E, Boffetta G. Turbulent fluid acceleration generates clusters of gyrotactic microorganisms. Physical Review Letters 2014; 112(4):044502.

Durham WM, Climent E, Barry M, De Lillo F, Boffetta G, Cencini M, Stocker R. Turbulence drives microscale patches of motile phytoplankton. Nature Communications 2013; 4.

Krane MH, Barry M, Wei T. Dynamics of temporal variations in phonatory flow. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 2010; 128:372–383.

Krane MH, Barry M, Wei T. Unsteady behavior of flow in a scaled-up vocal folds model. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 2007; 122:3659–3670.

Conference Proceedings


Barry M, Durham WM, Chengala A, Sheng J, Stocker R. Characterization of gyrotactic swimmers using digital holographic microscopy. 65th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics, San Diego, CA, November 18–20, 2012.

Barry M, Durham WM, Climent E, Stocker R. Shaken, but not stirred: how vortical flow drives small-scale aggregations of gyrotactic phytoplankton. 64th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics, Baltimore, MD, November 20–22, 2011.

Barry M, Krane M, Wei T. Design of apparatus for studying aerodynamics of voice production. American Society of Mechanical Engineers International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition, Anaheim, CA, November 2004.

Barry M, Krane M, Wei T. Flow in a scaled-up vocal folds model. International Conference on Vocal Fold Biomechanics and Physiology, Marseilles, France, August 2004.

Barry M, Krane M, Wei T. Measurements of scaled-up glottal flow: experiment design. 56th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Fluid Dynamics. East Rutherford, NJ, November 23–25, 2003.

Professional Affiliations

American Society of Mechanical Engineers (2014–present)

National Association of Fire Investigators (2014–present)

National Fire Protection Association (2014–present)

ASTM International (2015–present)

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), 2014
  • M.S., Mechanical Engineering, Rutgers University, 2005
  • M.S., Teaching, Pace University, 2008
  • B.S., Mechanical Engineering, Rutgers University, 2004
  • B.A., English, Rutgers University, 2004
  • National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship, 2009–2012

LICENSES & CERTIFICATIONS

Licensed Mechanical Engineer, California, #38065

Certified Fire and Explosion Investigator

40 Hour HAZWOPER certified

Blasting Certificate of Competency, Massachusetts, #BL-007235