Matthew Glassman
Matthew J. Glassman, Ph.D.
Associate
Polymer Science & Materials Chemistry
  • Menlo Park

Dr. Glassman specializes in the microstructural analysis and accelerated aging of plastics and composites, leveraging his core expertise in the synthesis, structure, and mechanics of crosslinked polymeric materials. He applies his broad experience in polymer chemistry, physics, and characterization to the development and failure analysis of diverse products, including energetic materials, gels, adhesives, coatings, elastomers, injection-molded parts, biomedical implants, and environmentally-responsive materials. He has worked on issues relevant to the automotive, consumer electronics, construction, medical device, and chemical industries.

Dr. Glassman studies chemical degradation, transport phenomena, viscoelasticity, and polymer structure across various length scales to develop a mechanistic understanding of failures in complex devices. In particular, he has extensive experience applying oscillatory shear rheometry (SAOS and LAOS) and mechanical testing to study viscoelastic materials. He also specializes in non-destructive testing of materials, including small angle X-ray, neutron, and light scattering methods (SAXS, SANS, DPLS, SLS, DLS) to understand the mechanisms of polymer assembly and the consequences on bulk properties. He is experienced in spectroscopic and chromatographic analytical techniques, including FTIR, NMR, UV/Vis, MALDI-TOF, and GPC, as well as thermal analysis, including TGA and DSC.

Dr. Glassman’s polymer chemistry background includes organic synthesis, conventional and controlled radical polymerization, as well as extensive experience in the production and modification of artificial polypeptides, including molecular biology, biosynthesis, and biofunctionalization. He is also familiar with in vitro biological techniques, including tissue culture and biocompatibility testing.

Dr. Glassman has applied his understanding of polymer chemistry and soft matter physics to engineer environmentally-responsive biomaterials for applications as injectable implants and biomimetic adhesives. His work involved controlling the nanostructure of shear-thinning hydrogels through block copolymer self-assembly and arrested phase separation. He has expertise in the modeling and simulation of small angle scattering experiments in order to describe gelation phenomena in systems with lower critical solution behavior. He has invented several strategies for forming thermally-responsive biomaterials from artificial polypeptides, as well as a synthetic route to oxidatively-responsive adhesives based on chemistry employed by marine mussels.

Prior to joining Exponent, Dr. Glassman was a Graduate Research Associate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). He has interned at a biotech startup focused on protein engineering.

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), 2015
  • B.S., Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology (Caltech), 2009
  • ACS POLY Division Excellence in Polymer Graduate Research, 2014

    NIH/MIT Biotechnology Training Program, 2011–2014

Publications

Glassman MJ, Avery RK, Khademhosseini A, Olsen BD. Toughening of thermoresponsive arrested networks of elastin-like polypeptides to engineer cytocompatible tissue scaffolds. Biomacromolecules 2016; 17(2): 415-426.

Glassman MJ and Olsen BD. Injectable hydrogels by physical crosslinking. In Lakshmi S. Nair (Ed.) Injectable hydrogels for regenerative engineering.2015; 97-154.

Glassman MJ, Olsen BD. Arrested phase separation of elastin-like polypeptide solutions yields stiff, thermoresponsive gels. Biomacromolecules 2015; 16(12): 3762-3773.

Kim M, Chen WG, Kang JW, Glassman MJ, Ribbeck K, Olsen BD. Artificially engineered protein hydrogels adapted from the nucleoporin nsp1 for selective biomolecular transport. Advanced Materials 2015; 27:4207-4212.

Glassman MJ, Olsen BD. End Block Design Modulates the Assembly and Mechanics of Thermoresponsive, Dual-Associative Protein Hydrogels. Macromolecules 2015; 48(6):1832-1842.

Qin G, Glassman MJ, Lam CN, Chang D, Schaible E, Hexemer A, Olsen BD. Topological effects on globular protein-ELP fusion block copolymer self-assembly. Advanced Functional Materials 2014; 25(5):729-738.

Zhou H, Schön E, Wang M, Glassman MJ, Liu J, Zhong M, Díaz Díaz D, Olsen BD, Johnson JA. Crossover experiments applied to network formation reactions: Improved strategies for counting elastically inactive molecular defects in PEG gels and hyperbranched polymers. JACS 2014; 136(26):9464-9470.

Tang S, Glassman MJ, Li S, Socrate S, Olsen BD. Oxidatively responsive chain extension to entangle engineered protein hydrogels. Macromolecules 2014; 47(2):791-799.

Glassman MJ Olsen BD. Structure and mechanical response of protein hydrogels reinforced by block copolymer self-assembly. Soft Matter 2013; 9:6814-6823.

Glassman MJ, Chan J, Olsen BD. Reinforcement of shear thinning protein hydrogels by responsive block copolymer self-assembly. Advanced Functional Materials 2013; 23:1182-1193.

Thomas CS, Glassman MJ, Olsen BD. Solid-state nanostructured materials from self-assembly of a globular protein-polymer diblock copolymer. ACS Nano 2011; 5:5697-5707.

Bloom JD, Glassman MJ. Inferring stabilizing mutations from protein phylogenies: Application to influenza hemagglutinin. PLoS Computational Biology 2009; 5(4).

Presentations

Glassman MJ, Avery RK, Vronay-Ruggles XT, Khademhosseini A, Olsen BD. Responsive gelation, toughening, and biocompatibility of nanostructured associative protein hydrogels containing elastin-like polypeptides. Oral presentation, Materials Research Society Fall Meeting, Boston, MA, 2014.

Glassman MJ, Li Q, Holten-Andersen N, Olsen BD. Engineering network associations for control of responsive reinforcement in nanostructured physical hydrogels. Oral presentation, American Chemical Society Spring Meeting, Dallas, TX, 2014.

Glassman MJ, Olsen BD. Double network physical gels from elastin-like polypeptide block copolymers: nansocale control of thermoresponsive reinforcement. Oral presentation, American Physical Society March Meeting, Denver, CO, 2014.

Glassman MJ, Olsen BD. Control of double network structure and mechanical behavior of thermoresponsively reinforced, shear thinning protein hydrogels. Oral presentation, Materials Research Society Fall Meeting, Boston, MA, 2013.

Glassman MJ, Chan J, Olsen BD. Molecular origins of reinforcement in responsively nanostructured, shear thinning double network hydrogels. Oral presentation, American Physical Society March Meeting, Baltimore, MD, 2013.

Glassman MJ, Li S, Chan J, Olsen BD. Block copolymer self-assembly for the responsive reinforcement of injectable protein hydrogels. Oral presentation, American Physical Society March Meeting. Boston, MA, 2012.

Glassman MJ, Li S, Olsen BD. Responsively nanostructured injectable protein hydrogels. Oral presentation, Materials Research Society Fall Meeting, Boston, MA, 2011.

Patents

US Patent Application No. 14/960,799: Catechol-rich polymers from N-substituted maleimides, July 7, 2016 (Glassman MJ and Olsen BD).

International Patent Application No. PCT/US2015/063382: Thermoreversible hydrogels from the arrested phase separation of elastin-like polypeptides, June 9, 2016 (Olsen BD, Glassman MJ, and Avery RK).

US Patent No. 8,916,683: Nanostructured Physically-Associating Hydrogels for Injectable, Responsive, and Tough Biomaterials, December 2014 (Olsen BD, Glassman MJ, and Chan J).

Professional Affiliations

American Institute of Chemical Engineers

Materials Research Society

American Physical Society

American Chemical Society

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Chemical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), 2015
  • B.S., Chemical Engineering, California Institute of Technology (Caltech), 2009
  • ACS POLY Division Excellence in Polymer Graduate Research, 2014

    NIH/MIT Biotechnology Training Program, 2011–2014