Jason Randel
Jason C. Randel, Ph.D.
Senior Associate
Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
  • Menlo Park

Dr. Randel’s expertise lies at the intersection of physics, materials science, electrical engineering, and data analysis. At Exponent, his work focuses on electrical micro-probing and failure analysis of consumer electronics, component failure investigations, and automation of analysis techniques. As a graduate student in Applied Physics at Stanford, his research focused on atomic-scale transport in materials with novel electronic properties. These materials included low-dissipation crystalline systems such as graphene and topological insulators, as well as monolayers of diamond-based molecules. His dissertation investigated the application of these materials to nanoscale electronic devices.

Dr. Randel has extensive experience in designing and operating scanning probe microscopes, feedback controllers, and cryogenic and ultra high vacuum systems. Much of his experimental work dealt with noisy, low-current signals that required advanced noise reduction techniques as well as analog and digital signal processing. He has also built software and user interfaces for image processing, pattern recognition, and automated measurement and data analysis. His programming capabilities include Matlab, Python, C++, and Objective-C. In addition, Dr. Randel has collaborated with Chevron Technical Ventures on developing applications for molecular diamonds.

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Applied Physics, Stanford University, 2011
  • B.S., Engineering Physics, The Ohio State University, 2004, summa cum laude
  • National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, 2004–2007

Publications

Kong D, Randel JC, Peng H, Cha JJ, Meister S, Lai K, Chen Y, Shen Z-X, Manoharan HC, Cui Y. Topical insulator nanowires and nanoribbons. Nano Letters 2010; 10:329–333.

Lee S, Toney MF, Ko W, Randel JC, Jung HJ, Munakata K, Lu J, Geballe TH, Beasley MR, Sinclair R, Manoharan HC, Salleo A. Laser-synthesized epitaxial grapheme. ACS Nano 2010; 4:75247230.

Willey TM, Lee JRI, Fabbri JD, Wang D, Mielsen MH, Randel JC, Schreiner PR, Fokin AA, Tkachenko BA, Folina NA, Dahl JEP, Carlson RMK, Terminello LJ, Melosh NA, van Buuren T. Determining orientational structure of diamondoid thiols attached to silver using near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Journal of Electron Spectroscopy and Related Phenomena 2009; 172:69–77.

Zeltzer G, Randel JC, Gupta AK, Bashir R, Song S-H, Manoharan HC. Scanning optical homodyne detection of high-frequency picoscale resonances in cantilever and tuning fork sensors. Applied Physics Letters 2007; 91:173124–26.

Kotov IV, Humanic TJ, Nouais D, Randel JC, Rashevsky A. Electric fields in nonhomogeneously doped silicon. Summary of simulations. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A; 2006; 568:41–45.

Patents

U.S. Patent Application: 12/865,391: Molecular rectifiers comprising diamondoids, 2011 (Yang W. Shen Z-X, Manoharan HC, Melosh NA, Kelly MA, Fokin AA, Schreiner PR, Randel JC).

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Applied Physics, Stanford University, 2011
  • B.S., Engineering Physics, The Ohio State University, 2004, summa cum laude
  • National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellow, 2004–2007