Robert Rauschenberger
Robert Rauschenberger, Ph.D.
Managing Scientist
Human Factors & Industrial Engineering
  • Phoenix

Dr. Rauschenberger is a cognitive psychologist with over 15 years of research on the topics of the conspicuity of visually presented information, distraction, human factors in product design, and human-product interface interaction. He routinely develops and evaluates the adequacy of warnings, instructions, and other disclosures. Dr. Rauschenberger has performed usability testing, human factors evaluations, workflow studies, measured reaction times and error rates, and instrumented tracking of eye gaze in a variety of domains. He applies the findings from his studies to reduce the risks in the interaction of humans with products and processes in their environments.

Dr. Rauschenberger’s studies include analysis of the influence of medical device and pharmaceutical information from manufacturers on clinical practices of health care providers and studies of the influence on consumers of product information provided on-line and in more traditional forms of distribution. Dr. Rauschenberger has also analyzed data from large accident and adverse event databases to determine the risk of products or activities and the potential presence of a ‘safety signal’ that might suggest the inclusion of a product warning. More recently, Dr. Rauschenberger has applied his background in attention, cognition, and decision-making to analyses of purchase decisions of plaintiffs in class action lawsuits to assess the uniformity of their processing of disclosures (or proposed disclosures) about a product.

Dr. Rauschenberger has served as program chair of the Healthcare Technical Group of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society for the past two years, and presently continues to serve as co-chair. He held the position of Adjunct Professor at the School of Interactive Arts and Technology at Simon Fraser University from 2008 through 2011. Prior to joining Exponent, Dr. Rauschenberger was a Principal Research Scientist at Siemens Corporate Research, where he helped design studies of the user experience of a number of products across different industries (healthcare, consumer, online, automotive). Prior to his time at Siemens, Dr. Rauschenberger was an Associate at Harvard University, a Visiting Scholar at MIT, and a Research Social Scientist at The University of Arizona; was the recipient of a National Science Foundation research grant; and was the co-investigator on a multi-year Department of Homeland Security contract to facilitate the interdiction of person-borne improvised explosive devices. He has served on the editorial board of Attention, Perception & Psychophysics, and has formerly served on the Grant Selection Committee of the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, in addition to having reviewed grant applications for the National Science Foundation and the Research Foundation Flanders (FWO), Belgium. Dr. Rauschenberger has completed the core curriculum for the German law degree (“Grundstudium”) at the University of Bonn (six semesters).

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Psychology, Johns Hopkins University, 2001
  • M.A., Psychology, Johns Hopkins University, 1998
  • B.A., Liberal Arts, Sarah Lawrence College, 1996
  • National Science Foundation Research Grant (2004–2007, as Principal Investigator)

    DHS Research Grant (as Co-PI), “Wide Area Surveillance and Suicide Bomber Detection”

    DHS Research Grant (as Co-PI), Center of Excellence for the Awareness and Localization of Explosives-Related Threats (ALERT)

    U.S. DOT DTRT5714R20001 (as team member), “Operations Research and Analysis (ORA) Services”

LANGUAGES

  • German

Publications

Lester BD, Hashish R, Kim R, Moorman H, Hildebrand E, Schwark J, Rauschenberger R, Young D. Mobile device usage influences gaze patterns to obstacles during locomotion. Proceedings, Industrial & Systems Engineering Research Conference, Anaheim, CA, 2016.

Barakat B, Crump C, Cades D, Rauschenberger R, Schwark J, Hildebrand E, Young D. Eye tracking evaluation of driver visual behavior with a forward collision warning and mitigation system. Proceedings, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 59th Annual Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, 2015.

Rauschenberger R, Sala JB, Wood CT. Product warnings and the involuntary capture of attention. Proceedings, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 59th Annual Meeting, Los Angeles, CA, 2015.

Schwark J, Fowler G, Larson R, Rauschenberger R. An investigation of operator performance in All-Terrain Vehicle (ATV) handling and control. Procedia Manufacturing 2015; 20:1567–1574.

Crump C, Cades D, Rauschenberger R, Hildebrand E. et al. Driver reactions in a vehicle with collision warning and mitigation technology. SAE Technical Paper 2015-01-1411, 2015. doi:10.4271/2015-01-1411.

Crump C, Cades D, Rauschenberger R, Hildebrand EA, Young DE. Dynamic on-road method for evaluation of Advanced Driver Assistance System (ADAS). Proceedings, 3rd Annual World Conference of the Society for Industrial and Systems Engineering, pp. 77–81, San Antonio, TX, October 20–22, 2014. ISBN: 97819384960-2-8.

Rauschenberger R, Wood CT, Sala JB. Human factors and the design of medical devices. In: Bringing your medical device to market. Reiss JB (ed), pp. 215–226, Food and Drug Law Institute, 2013.

Kuzel MJ, Cohen H, Cohen J, Rauschenberger R. Evaluation of mobile eye tracking for forensic analysis of pedestrian falls. Proceedings, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 57th Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA, 2013.

Heckman GM, Kim RS, Lin S, Rauschenberger R, Young DE, Lange R. Drivers’ visual behavior during backing tasks: Factors affecting the use of rearview camera displays. Proceedings, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 56th Annual Meeting, Boston, MA, 2012.

Kim R, Rauschenberger R, Heckman G, Young D, Lange R. Efficacy and usage patterns for three types of rearview camera displays during backing up. Proceedings, Society of Automobile Engineers World Congress, Detroit, MI, 2012.

Zheng XS, Kiekebosch J, Rauschenberger R. Attention-aware human-machine interface to support video surveillance task. Proceedings, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 55th Annual Meeting, Las Vegas, NV, 2011.

Sala JB, Nichols EA, Muhammad R, Lakhiani SD, Rauschenberger R, Wood CT. Government, warnings, and safety information: A comparison of inter-agency regulations and guidance. In: Advances in Human Factors, Ergonomics, and Safety in Manufacturing and Service Industries. Karwowski W, Salvendi G (eds), pp. 1047–1056, CRC Press, 2010.

Rauschenberger R. Reentrant processing in attentional guidance—Time to abandon old dichotomies. Invited editorial. Acta Psychologica 2010; 135:109–111.

Rauschenberger R, Lin JJW, Zheng XS, Lafleur C. Subset search for icons of different spatial frequencies. Proceedings, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 53rd Annual Meeting, San Antonio, TX, 2009.

Zheng XS, Chakraborty I, Lin JJW, Rauschenberger R. Correlating low-level image statistics with users’ rapid aesthetic and affective judgments of web pages. Long Paper presented at the 2009 CHI conference, Boston, MA, 2009. (Nominated for Best Paper CHI 2009.)

Carlson TA, Rauschenberger R, Verstraten FAJ. No representation without awareness in the Lateral Occipital complex. Psychological Science 2007; 18:298–302.

Zheng XS, Sapundshiev I, Rauschenberger R. WikiTable: A new tool for collaborative authoring and data management. HCI 2007; 15:501–508.

Zheng XS, Chakraborty I, Lin JJW, Rauschenberger R. Developing metrics to predict users’ perceptions of interface design. Proceedings, Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 52nd Annual Meeting, New York, NY, 2008.

Rauschenberger R, Yantis S. Perceptual encoding efficiency in visual search. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 2006; 135:116–131.

Rauschenberger R, Liu T, Slotnick SD, Yantis S. Temporally unfolding neural representation of pictorial occlusion. Psychological Science 2006; 17:358–364.

Rauschenberger R, Chu H. The effects of familiarity on encoding efficiency in visual search. Perception & Psychophysics 2006; 68:770–775.

Rauschenberger R, Mosca F, Peterson MA, Bruno N. Amodal completion in visual search: Preemption or context effects? Psychological Science 2004; 15:351–355.

Rauschenberger R. When something old becomes something new: Spatiotemporal object continuity and attentional capture. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 2003; 29:600–615.

Rauschenberger R. Attentional capture by auto- and allo-cues. Psychonomic Bulletin & Review 2003; 10:814–842.

Rauschenberger R, Yantis S. Masking unveils pre-amodal completion representation in visual search. Nature 2001; 410:369–372.

Rauschenberger R, Yantis S. Attentional capture by globally-defined objects. Perception & Psychophysics 2001; 63:1250–1261.

Enns JT, Austen EL, DiLollo V, Rauschenberger R, Yantis S. New objects dominate luminance transients in setting attentional priority. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance 2001; 27:1287–1302.

Presentations

Rauschenberger R, Hildebrand E. A product liability perspective on medical device development. Paper presented at the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Healthcare Symposium, Baltimore, MD, April 2015.

Heckman G, Rauschenberger R, Kim R, Young D, Lange R. A comparative evaluation of rearview camera display locations: Collision avoidance outcomes and use patterns. Paper presented at the SAE Government/Industry meeting, Washington, DC, January 2012.

Rauschenberger R. Human factors in product design and liability: The role of attention. Paper presented at The West Coast Product Safety & Liability Conference: Presentations for Manufacturers by Leading Experts & Attorneys, Los Angeles, CA, March 2010.

Rauschenberger R, Yantis S. Attentional capture through levels of representation. Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 1998.

Rauschenberger R, Yantis S. Search asymmetries revisited: A new theory of visual attention. Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Los Angeles, CA, November 1999.

Rauschenberger R, Yantis S. What can search asymmetries really tell us? Paper presented at the Annual EPA Vision and Attention Meeting, Baltimore, MD, March 2000.

Rauschenberger R, Yantis S. Completing the picture: Representations of amodally completed objects in visual search. Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Fort Lauderdale, FL, May 2000.

Rauschenberger R, Yantis S. What counts as a new object in the new-object hypothesis of attentional capture? Poster presented at the Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Sarasota, FL, May 2001.

Rauschenberger R, Peterson MA, Mosca F, Bruno N. A modified search task investigates an alternative to the two-stage model of amodal completion. Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Sarasota, FL, May 2002.

Schulz MF, Rauschenberger R, Peterson MA. Amodal completion in passively viewed displays: A priming study. Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Sarasota, FL, May 2002.

Liu T, Rauschenberger R, Slotnick SD, Yantis S. Neural signatures of amodal completion. Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Neuroscience Society, New York, NY, March 2003.

Peterson MA, Rauschenberger R. Context effects on border assignment in the target stimulus in visual search. Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Sarasota, FL, May 2003.

Rauschenberger R, Liu T, Slotnick SD, Yantis S. Cortical representation of pictorial occlusions in early visual areas and LOC. Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Sarasota, FL, May 2003.

Skow-Grant E, Rauschenberger R, Peterson MA. Attention, not inhibition of return, tracks objects. Paper presented at the 11th Annual Workshop on Object Perception, Attention, and Memory, Vancouver, Canada, November 2003.

Rauschenberger R, Peterson MA. When unambiguous stimuli become ambiguous: Spatiotemporal context effects with nominally unambiguous stimuli. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Sarasota, FL, May 2004.

Rauschenberger R, Chu H. The effects of familiarity on encoding efficiency in visual search. Poster presented at the Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society, Sarasota, FL, May 2005.

Carlson TA, Rauschenberger R, Verstraten FAJ. Cortical adaptation of unconscious perceptual representations. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the European Conference on Visual Perception, A Coruña, Spain, August 2005.

Rauschenberger R, Lin JW. Workflow analysis for patients’ visits in VAMC audiology departments. Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Association of VA Audiologists, Denver, CO, April 2007.

Chakraborty, I, Zheng XS, Lin J, Rauschenberger R. Computational eye movement model based on adaptive saliency map. Paper presented at the Annual Fall Vision Meeting, Berkeley, CA, September 2007.

Invited Presentations

Rauschenberger R. Taking a “Q” from human factors: Visual search in HMI design. Keynote address for the HFES Regional Conference, California State University Long Beach, Long Beach, CA, February 2011.

Rauschenberger R. Taking a “Q” from human factors: Visual search in HMI design. Cognitive Science and Engineering Department, Arizona State University College of Technology & Innovation, January 2011.

Cognitive engineering for airport security screening. Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, BC, 2009.

When what you design is not what you get. Microsoft Research Lab, Redmond, WA, 2009.

An idiosyncratic perspective on visual search and perception. University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada, 2008.

An idiosyncratic perspective on visual search and perception. Notre Dame University, South Bend, IN, 2008.

When what you design is not what you get. Universität Bielefeld, Bielefeld, Germany, 2006.

When what you design is not what you get. Deutsche Luft- und Raumfahrtgesellschaft, Braunschweig, Germany, 2006.

When what you design is not what you get. SIAT, Simon Fraser University, Vancouver, Canada, 2006.

Dynamic interactions in visual search displays: When less is more. Yale University, New Haven, CT, 2005.

Dynamic representations of the visual world. University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 2004.

Dynamic representations of the visual world. Royal Holloway University, London, UK, 2004.

Dynamic representations of the visual world. University of Delaware, Newark, DE, 2004.

Dynamic representations of the visual world. University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, Scotland, 2004.

Dynamic interactions in visual search displays. Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, 2004.

When more is less: Visual search difficulty and exposure time. Siemens Corporate Research, Princeton, NJ, 2004.

An idiosyncratic perspective on visual search and perception. Vision Sciences Laboratory, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, 2004.

Attentional capture by auto- and allo-cues. Visual Attention Lab., Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA, 2004.

Dynamic representations of the visual world. University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, 2003.

Masking unveils visual representations in the brain. University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ, 2001.

Masking unveils visual representations in the brain Sarah Lawrence College, Bronxville, NY, 2000.


Prior Experience

Principal Research Scientist, Siemens Corporate Research, 2005–2009

Visiting Scholar, MIT, 2004–2005

Associate, Harvard University, 2004–2005

Research Social Scientist, The University of Arizona, 2004–2005

Postdoctoral Fellow, The University of Arizona, 2001–2004 

Academic Appointments

Lecturer, Drexel University, 2013–2016

Professional Affiliations

Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

Psychonomic Society

Project Experience

Evaluated the adequacy of warnings and their propensity to effect behavioral change within the context of failure to warn product liability litigation.

Assisted companies with development and evaluation of safety communication (product warnings, user manuals, marketing disclosures) for consumer, healthcare and online products.

Assisted companies with 510(k) submissions to the FDA for clearance for marketing of medical devices by conducting human factors studies.

Assisted companies with their response to inquiries from government agencies (e.g., FDA) regarding the safety of their products, by conducting human factors evaluations and analyzing data from large databases of accident and adverse event records.

Designed healthcare and consumer products now deployed in the marketplace, and evaluated the safety of healthcare products in a product liability context, using, among other things, such technologies as eye-tracking and balance platforms.

Used scientific methods to study the factors that lead to distraction and inattention, as well as the factors that determine the efficiency of visual search (e.g., for warnings).


Additional Information

Peer Reviewer

National Science Foundation

Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

Research Foundation Flanders (FWO), Belgium

Psychological Science

Cognitive Psychology

Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance

Vision Research

Journal of Vision

Visual Cognition

Attention, Perception & Psychophysics

Psychonomic Bulletin & Review

acta psychologica

Experimental Psychology

Emotion

CHI

Graphics Interface

Scholarpedia

Consciousness & Cognition

PLoS ONE

Leonardo

Cognitive Science

Knowledge

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Psychology, Johns Hopkins University, 2001
  • M.A., Psychology, Johns Hopkins University, 1998
  • B.A., Liberal Arts, Sarah Lawrence College, 1996
  • National Science Foundation Research Grant (2004–2007, as Principal Investigator)

    DHS Research Grant (as Co-PI), “Wide Area Surveillance and Suicide Bomber Detection”

    DHS Research Grant (as Co-PI), Center of Excellence for the Awareness and Localization of Explosives-Related Threats (ALERT)

    U.S. DOT DTRT5714R20001 (as team member), “Operations Research and Analysis (ORA) Services”

LANGUAGES

  • German