Scott Reed
Scott A. Reed, Ph.D.
Scientist
Human Factors & Industrial Engineering
  • Seattle

Dr. Reed has expertise in visual perception, attention, and cognition, and uses a combination of behavioral measurements, eye-tracking, and electrophysiological recordings to examine these processes and how they may contribute to different types of errors in human performance. Specifically, Dr. Reed applies his expertise to investigate accidents, injuries, and causes of human error, including transportation accidents (autos, motorcycles, bus, bicycle, pedestrian, etc.), occupational accidents, and slip/trip/fall accidents. Dr. Reed has conducted research on how perceptual judgments, eye movements, and response time are affected by contextual information in a scene, and how perceptual and motor responses are differentially prone to specific types of errors. He has also investigated human performance factors related to visual search, sensory adaptation, and multiple-object tracking, and how cognitive traits can affect these abilities.

Prior to joining Exponent, Dr. Reed completed his Ph.D. at the University of Oregon, where he studied visual perception and cognitive neuroscience. His dissertation examined how cognitive traits can differentially affect the magnitude of perceptual and motor errors when interacting with spatial displays. Dr. Reed has been an instructor at multiple universities and has taught courses in perception, human performance, learning and memory, biological psychology, research methods, and general psychology.

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Oregon, 2014
  • M.A., Psychological Science, California State University, Chico, 2005
  • B.A., Psychology, California State University, Chico, 2002

Publications

Dassonville, P. & Reed, S.A. (2015). The two-wrongs model explains perception-action dissociations for illusions driven by distortions of the egocentric reference frame. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, 9, 1-16.

Dassonville, P., Lester, B.D., & Reed, S.A. (2014). An allocentric exception confirms an egocentric rule: a comment on Taghizadeh and Gail (2014). Frontiers in Human
Neuroscience, 8, 1-2.

Reed, S.A., & Dassonville, P. (2014). Adaptation to leftward-shifting prisms enhances local processing in healthy individuals. Neuropsychologia, 56, 418-427.

Conference Abstracts

Peterson, J., Kenny, R., Reed, S.A., & Dassonville, P. (2014). A two-factor structure within the systemizing trait of autism differentially predicts susceptibility to lateral and collinear flanker effects. Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting, St. Pete’s Beach, FL.

Reed, S.A., Farley, M., & Dassonville, P. (2014). Delineating the mechanisms of the rod-andframe illusion. Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting, St. Pete’s Beach, FL.

Reed, S.A., & Dassonville, P. (2013). Embedded figures performance is modulated by an ‘analytical tendencies’ factor within the systemizing trait of autism. Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting, Naples, FL.

Reed, S.A., & Dassonville, P. (2012). Illusion susceptibility indicates a two-factor structure to the systemizing trait of autism. Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting, Naples, FL.

Lester, B., Reed, S.A., & Dassonville, P. (2012). Surround suppression is modulated by an “insistence on sameness” factor within the systemizing trait of autism. Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting, Naples, FL.

Reed, S.A., & Dassonville, P. (2012). Illusion susceptibility indicates a two-factor structure to the systemizing trait of autism. Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting, Naples, FL.

Lester, B., Reed, S.A., & Dassonville, P. (2012). Surround suppression is modulated by an “insistence on sameness” factor within the systemizing trait of autism. Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting, Naples, FL.

Reed, S.A., McCollough, A., & Vogel, E. (2011). Neural measures of object tracking are modulated by sensitivity to motion information. Cognitive Science Association for Interactive Learning Annual Meeting, Hood River, OR.

Dassonville, P., & Reed, S.A. (2011). Leftward prism adaptation increases sensitivity to local cues in healthy individuals. Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting, Naples, FL.

Reed, S.A., & Dassonville, P. (2011). Using prism adaptation to understand visual processing in hemispatial neglect. University of Oregon Graduate Student Research Forum, Eugene, OR.

Reed, S.A., & Dassonville, P. (2010). Configural and feature-based processing of human faces and their relation to autistic tendencies. Vision Sciences Society Annual Meeting,
Naples, FL.

Reed, S.A. (2008). The detection of deception in neutral and emotionally-masked facial expressions. Western Psychological Association Annual Conference, Los Angeles, CA.

Presentations

Reed, S.A. (2015). Seeing the world differently: Cognitive traits and perceptual biases. Autism Interest Group, Eugene, OR.

Reed, S.A. (2011). Autism, systemizing, and the illusion of the extreme male brain. Autism Interest Group, Eugene, OR.

Reed, S.A. (2010). Learning and memory. Humphrey Fellowship Program, Eugene, OR.

Reed, S.A. (2009). The psychology of memory. Humphrey Fellowship Program, Eugene, OR.


Prior Experience

Graduate Teaching Fellow, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, 2008-2014

Advisor, Department of Rehabilitation, Chico, CA, 2004-2006

Academic Appointments

Instructor, Department of Psychology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR, 2014-2015

Lecturer, Department of Psychology, California State University, Chico, CA, 2005-2008

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Oregon, 2014
  • M.A., Psychological Science, California State University, Chico, 2005
  • B.A., Psychology, California State University, Chico, 2002