Megan Tooney
Megan Toney-Bolger, Ph.D.
Senior Associate
Biomechanics
  • Detroit

Dr. Toney-Bolger's areas of expertise include kinematics, dynamics, neuromechanics, motor control of human motion, and human injury. Her research has focused on the biomechanics of human walking and running, amputee locomotion, neural control of locomotion, gait rehabilitation technology, and motor learning responses in gait before and after injury or impairment. Dr. Toney-Bolger’s work includes the analysis of a variety of injuries occurring in vehicular, pedestrian, occupational, recreational, and slip and fall accidents.

Dr. Toney-Bolger also has technical knowledge and training in the areas of gait analysis techniques and use of the 3D Static Strength Prediction Program. She is a certified forklift operator and certified XL tribometrist. She has also completed training in traffic crash reconstruction through the Northwestern University Center for Public Safety.

Prior to joining Exponent, Dr. Toney-Bolger was a Graduate Research Assistant in the Comparative Neuromechanics Laboratory at Georgia Institute of Technology where she completed a National Institutes of Health Fellowship for Prosthetics and Orthotics Research Training. Her research evaluated the effect of amputation on a patient's control strategies, their ability to walk, and their adaptation to altered walking environments. Dr. Toney-Bolger has experience collecting and analyzing kinematic, kinetic, and electromyography (EMG) data using high-speed motion capture systems (VICON) and advanced computational software (Matlab and LabVIEW). Dr. Toney-Bolger also served as a Graduate Teaching Assistant at Georgia Tech for a graduate-level course in clinical gait analysis. In addition, Dr. Toney-Bolger conducted research in the Orthopaedic Biomechanics Laboratory at Duke University where she studied responses to air blast at both the cellular and organismal level.

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Applied Physiology, Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), 2014
  • B.S.E., Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, 2009
  • NIH Fellow for Prosthetics and Orthotics Research Training, 2009–2012

    Finalist for P.E.O. Scholar Award from Georgia Institute of Technology

Publications

Toney M, Chang YH. The motor and the brake of the trailing leg in human walking: leg force control through ankle modulation and knee covariance. Experimental Brain Research 2016; 234(10):3011-3023.

Thajchayapong M, Cho G, Toney M, Chang YH. Changes in total mechanical work explain why metabolic cost tracks locomotor adaptation during split-belt treadmill walking. Poster No. T272, 7th World Congress of Biomechanics, Boston, MA, July 6–11, 2014.

Toney M, Chang YH. Consistent power production during walking is maintained by structuring joint torque variance to modulate trailing leg forces. Poster No. T267, 7th World Congress of Biomechanics, Boston, MA, July 6–11, 2014.

Toney M, Chang YH. Humans robustly adhere to dynamic walking principles by harnessing motor abundance to stabilize forces. Experimental Brain Research 2013; 231(4):433–443.

Toney M, Chang YH. Amputees use less joint torque covariation than able-bodied subjects to generate leg force during walking. Podium Presentation, XXIV Congress of the International Society of Biomechanics, Natal, Rio Grande Do Norte, Brazil, August 4–9, 2013.

Toney M, Chang YH. Identifying implicit neuromechanical control targets in human gait. Poster No. 274.05/JJ3, 42nd Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting, New Orleans, LA, October 13–17, 2012.

Toney M, Chang YH. Limb force variance is structured to stabilize the step-to-step transitions of dynamic walking. Abstract No. 285, 36th American Society of Biomechanics Annual Meeting. Gainesville, FL, August 15–18, 2012.

Norman T, Toney M, Chang YH. The Gait Deviation Index for analysis of amputee walking at different speeds. 38th American Academy of Orthotists and Prosthetists Annual Meeting and Scientific Symposium, Atlanta, GA, March 21–24, 2012.

Herrin K, Toney M, Chang YH. Use of neuromechanical redundancy for locomotor compensation in able-bodied and transtibial amputee subjects. Abstract No. 400, 34th American Society of Biomechanics Annual Meeting. Providence, RI, August 18–21, 2010.

Professional Affiliations

American Society of Biomechanics

Society of Automotive Engineers

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Applied Physiology, Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), 2014
  • B.S.E., Biomedical Engineering, Duke University, 2009
  • NIH Fellow for Prosthetics and Orthotics Research Training, 2009–2012

    Finalist for P.E.O. Scholar Award from Georgia Institute of Technology