Kayla Anatone-Ruiz

Kayla Anatone-Ruiz, Ph.D.

Scientist
Ecological & Biological Sciences
Maynard
  • CV (English)
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Dr. Kayla Anatone-Ruiz is an environmental biologist, with over seven years of experience evaluating the impacts of anthropogenic disturbances on aquatic ecosystems. As part of her evaluations, she planned, managed, and performed detailed field and laboratory studies that evaluated the biological and genetic risks of chemical pollutants to aquatic organisms. Her work also focused on elucidating exposure pathways for heavy metals, particularly mercury, to aquatic biota in freshwater and estuary habitats. Dr. Anatone-Ruiz has extensive experience collecting environmental samples and measuring contaminants in samples of natural waters, sediments, fishes, benthic macroinvertebrates, and vegetation. Her experience extends to freshwater streams, lakes, estuaries, and wetlands in the United States.

Dr. Anatone-Ruiz’s scientific knowledge and experience allows her to address complex environmental challenges facing clients in many sectors. She has previously applied her environmental expertise to conduct research on nutrient loading to receiving waters during her time working for a commission which operated wastewater treatment plants and infrastructure interceptors, such as sewer overflows. Specifically, she has tracked nutrient inputs from wastewater treatment facilities and non-point sources to identify nutrient impacts on estuaries in Rhode Island. Her doctoral research focused on determining the ecosystem health, using an indigenous fish species as a health indicator, of a river historically polluted with mercury and established the main genetic effects of mercury pollution on fish living within the river system. The success of this project came from her initiating multi-stakeholder collaborations with government agencies, universities, and non-profit organizations to conduct this research. Dr. Anatone-Ruiz used field samples, laboratory experiments, scientific literature, and statistical tools to develop scientifically defensible conclusions. She has published original research articles in Chemosphere and in the Open Journal of Ecology. She has also presented her work at local and national conferences.

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Biology, Wesleyan University, 2021
  • M.E.S.M., Wetland Biology, University of Rhode Island, 2014
  • B.S., Environmental Science, University of Connecticut, 2012

Publications

Anatone, K., Z. Baumann, R. P. Mason, G. Hansen, and B. Chernoff. Century-old mercury pollution: Evaluating the impacts on local fish from the eastern United States. Chemosphere 2020; 259.

Loomis, S., K. Anatone, L. Bither, S.J. Kang, N. Neri, D. Machado, M. L. Kraczkowski, and B. Chernoff. Microgeographic variation and inter-riffle migration of Rhinichthys atratulus (Pisces: Cyprinidae) in a small Connecticut stream, United States. Open Journal of Ecology 2020; 10.

Presentations

Anatone-Ruiz, K. Z. Baumann, R. P. Mason, G. Hansen, and B. Chernoff. Legacy mercury pollution in the Still River watershed and its impact on the local fauna. Oral Presentation, Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, Hartford, CT, 2020.

Anatone, K., Z. Baumann, R. P. Mason, G. Hansen, and B. Chernoff. Fish Muscle Tissue Alone does not Indicate the Environmental Quality of a Historically Mercury Polluted River. Oral Presentation, Southern New England Chapter of the American Fisheries Society, Cambridge, MA, 2020.

Anatone, K., Z. Baumann, R. P. Mason, G. Hansen, and B. Chernoff. Mercury Exposure and Genetic Ecotoxicological Consequences in Blacknose Dace, Rhinichthys atratulus, Living in a Historically Mercury Polluted River. Poster Presentation, International Conference of Mercury as a Global Pollutant, Krakow, Poland, 2019.

Anatone, K., and B. Chernoff. The Evolutionary Consequences of Living in a Historically Metal Polluted River: the Genetic Variation of Blacknose Dace (Rhinichthys atratulus). Oral Presentation, American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, Rochester, NY, 2018.

Anatone, K. and B. Chernoff. Barriers to Gene Flow for One Species of Dace (Rhinichthys atratulus) in three Connecticut Streams. Oral Presentation, American Society of Ichthyologists and Herpetologists, Austin, TX, 2017.

Prior Experience

Graduate Research and Teaching Assistant, Wesleyan University, 2014 – 2020

Environmental Specialist, Narragansett Bay Commission, 2014

Graduate Research and Teaching Assistant, University of Rhode Island, 2012 – 2014

Professional Affiliations

American Fisheries Society (AFS)

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Biology, Wesleyan University, 2021
  • M.E.S.M., Wetland Biology, University of Rhode Island, 2014
  • B.S., Environmental Science, University of Connecticut, 2012