Steven Beighley
Steven Beighley, Ph.D.
Scientist
Human Factors
Philadelphia

Dr. Beighley is a cognitive psychologist with expertise in human perception, attention, and memory. His experience informs critical human factors issues such as evaluations of safety and hazard warnings, assessment of how environmental factors impact an observer’s on-line information processing abilities, and critical appraisals of eyewitness memory. With a strong background in experimental design, Dr. Beighley is able to inform clients’ questions with empirical measures of human behavior, whether it be an individual’s looking preferences when presented with a particular stimulus or a large-scale user study.

Dr. Beighley received his Ph.D. from the department of Psychological and Brain Sciences at the University of Delaware. His research has focused on visual-spatial memory errors for the details of a view, and he has published work on common memory errors in vision, such as distortions of spatial distances and false memories of details that were not present in the original view. He also has experience in developmental psychology, having studied children’s ability to accurately perceive and remember visual information relative to adults. Additional studies have assessed the effects of an observer’s emotional state on visual perception and memory, informing our understanding of how different emotions may enhance or distort various aspects of memory. Throughout these investigations, Dr. Beighley has accumulated years of experience assessing human performance in both the laboratory and the field using a variety of behavioral and physiological measures. Prior to earning his Ph.D., Dr. Beighley earned his M.A. in Neurophilosophy at Georgia State University concentrating on information processing in non-human animals and the application of neuroscience to the law. Dr. Beighley earned his B.A. in neuroscience, where he studied the relationship between neurogenesis and memory in the hippocampus.

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Psychology, University of Delaware, 2017
  • M.A., Neurophilosophy, Georgia State University, 2011
  • B.A., Neuroscience, University of Delaware, 2009

Publications

Beighley S, Intraub H Does inversion affect boundary extension for briefly-presented views? Visual Cognition 2016; 24(3): 252-259.

Adams F, Beighley S. Information, meaning, and animal communication. In: Animal Communication Theory: Information and Influence. Stegmann, U. (Ed.) 2013; 399-420. Cambridge University Press.

Adams F, Beighley S. The mark of the mental. In: The continuum companion to the philosophy of mind. In J. Garvey (Ed.) 2011; (54-72). London, UK: Continuum International Publishing Group.

Presentations

Beighley S, Sacco GA, Bauer L, Hayes AM, Intraub H Does emotional picture content affect boundary extension? 57th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society. Boston, MA, 19 November, 2016.

Intraub H, Ly A, Vlachos E, Beighley S. Preschoolers’ spatial memory for briefly-presented photographs. 57th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society. Boston, MA, 19 November, 2016.

Beighley S, Intraub H. Object knowledge influences how quickly and easily we imagine a scene. 23rd Annual Meeting on Object Perception, Attention, and Memory. Chicago, IL, 19 November, 2015.

Beighley S, Intraub H. Space in context: object-to-context associations affect the ease of scene imagination. 56th Annual meeting of the Psychonomic Society. Long Beach, CA, 21 November, 2014.

Intraub H, Beighley S, Gaitan H. Spatial story telling: the role of imagination in scene perception and memory. 56th Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society. Long Beach, CA, 21 November, 2014

Overby L, Barsky L, Beighley S, Yeliseyev D. Assessing student engagement through e-portfolio: the summer scholars program at the University of Delaware. Council for Undergraduate Research. Washington, DC, 29 June, 2014.

Beighley S, Tornetta S, Intraub H. Visual and linguistic measures of spatial coherence in memory for scene. Poster presented at the 55th Annual meeting of the Psychonomic Society. Toronto, Canada, 15 November, 2013.

Beighley S, ntraub H. A new “twist” on boundary extension: We falsely remember more surrounding space when the world is upside-down. 20th Annual Meeting on Object Perception, Attention, and Memory. Minneapolis, MN, 14 November, 2012.

Beighley S, Intraub H. What’s “up” in boundary extension? Brief rotated views are remembered as more expansive. Annual Meeting of the Vision Sciences Society. Naples, FL, 12 May, 2012.

Pusecker K, Overby L, Meiman M, Beighley S. Assessing the effects of undergraduate research through use of an online e-portfolio system. Talk given at the American Association of Colleges and Universities. Durham, NC, November, 2010.

Adams F, Beighley S. The mark of the mental. Talk given at the UD Undergraduate Research Symposium. Newark, DE, August, 2008.

Academic Appointments

Instructor of Record, Philosophy, Georgia State University (2009-2011)

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Psychology, University of Delaware, 2017
  • M.A., Neurophilosophy, Georgia State University, 2011
  • B.A., Neuroscience, University of Delaware, 2009