Margaret Payne

Margaret E. Payne, Ph.D.

Associate
Electrical Engineering & Computer Science
Menlo Park
  • CV (English)
  • Contact Card

Dr. Payne is trained in electrical engineering and her expertise lies in electronics as well as optical and material characterization. Her research experience spans electrochemical sensing, optical electronic devices, flexible and printed electronics, optical characterization of materials, electronic characterization of materials, and device fabrication.

Prior to joining Exponent, Dr. Payne developed and optimized fully-printed enzymatic sensors for determination of lactate in sweat, as well as fully-printed potentiometric sensors for determination of nitrate in soil. Through these projects as a graduate student at the University of California, Berkeley, she has developed expertise in printed device fabrication, flexible electronics, electrochemical characterization, and spectrophotometry. She has also developed and optimized polymer-fullerene nanoparticles dispersed in aqueous solution for use in printed photovoltaics. Through this project, she has developed expertise in optical device development, DLS, and characterization of devices and materials. She also has extensive experience in compliance with chemical safety standards. Furthermore, Dr. Payne has experience in crystal growth and nucleation, chemical vapor deposition, atomic layer deposition, inkjet, screen, spray, and blade printing of electronic materials.

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, 2020
  • B.S., Physics, Wake Forest University, 2014
  • Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor Award, 2019

    National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Award, 2016

    Berkeley Excellence Award, 2014

Publications

Wu X, Ahmed M, Khan Y, Payne ME, Zhu J, Evans JW, Arias AC. A potentimetric mechanotransduction mechanism for novel electronic skins. Science Avances 2020; 6:eaba1062.

Payne ME, Zamarayeva A, Pister VI, Yamamoto NAD, Arias AC. Printed, Flexible Lactate Sensors: Design Considerations Before Performing On-Body Measurements. Scientific Reports 2019; 9:1-10.

Yamamoto NAD, Payne ME, Koehler M, Facchetti A, Roman LS, Arias AC. Charge transport model for photovoltaic devices based on printed polymer:fullerene nanoparticles. Solar Energy Materials and Solar Cells 2015; 141:171-177.

Goetz KP, Fonari A, Vermeulen D, Hu P, Jiang H, Diemer PJ, Ward JW, Payne ME, Day CS, Kloc C, Coropceanu V, McNeil LE, Jurchescu OD. Freezing in orientational disorder induces crossover from thermally-activated to temperature-independent transport in organic semiconductors. Nature Communications 2014; 5:1-8.

Payne ME, Goetz KP, Day CS, Jurchescu OD. The 1:1 charge-transfer complex dibenzotetrathiafulvalene-pyromellitic dianhydride (DBTTF:PMDA). Acta Crystallographica E 2014; 70:o844-o845.

Goetz KP, Vermeulen D, Payne ME, Kloc C, McNeil LE, Jurchescu OD. Charge-transfer complexes: new perspectives on an old class of compounds. Journal of Materials Chemistry C 2014; 2:3065-3076.

Prior Experience

Lab Safety Officer, Flexible Electronic Devices and Systems Lab, University of California, Berkeley, 2015-2020

Head Lab Teaching Assistant, University of California, Berkeley, 2019

Teaching Assistant, Wake Forest University, 2013-2014

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences, University of California, Berkeley, 2020
  • B.S., Physics, Wake Forest University, 2014
  • Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor Award, 2019

    National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Award, 2016

    Berkeley Excellence Award, 2014