Daniel Wood
Daniel K. Wood, Ph.D.
Scientist
Human Factors
Chicago - Downtown

Dr. Wood is a cognitive neuroscientist and data scientist with over 10 years of experience in human movement, visual perception, attention, and cognition. He specializes in issues related to visual attention in cluttered and ambiguous environments, skilled and automatic behaviors (e.g., driving, sports, repetitive movements), and visually guided reaching and grasping. Dr. Wood applies his expertise to the analysis of human factors issues related to a variety of contexts, including transportation and pedestrian accidents; slips, trips, and falls; and product warnings and safety information.

Prior to joining Exponent, Dr. Wood received his Ph.D. in neuroscience from Western University. His graduate work focused on how humans select targets, allocate attention, and avoid distractors in order to rapidly and efficiently navigate cluttered and ambiguous environments. Following his Ph.D., he completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Northwestern University, where he studied how the brain combines visual, motor, and cognitive factors while deciding where to look next during naturalistic search behavior.

Dr. Wood has expertise in a wide range of experimental techniques, including: 3D motion capture (marker-based and markerless) of human and rigid-body kinematics, eye tracking, grip and lift force transduction, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), electroencephalography (EEG), surface and intramuscular electromyography (EMG), single-cell electrophysiology, histological techniques (e.g., staining, dye- and virus-based neural tract-tracing, confocal microscopy), and neuropsychological assessment. He regularly employs various analytical techniques and technologies in his research, including: statistics, machine learning, time-series analysis, data visualization, databases, and natural language processing.

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Neuroscience, University of Western Ontario, Canada, 2014
  • M.Sc., Neuroscience, University of Western Ontario, Canada, 2010
  • B.A., Philosophy with Honors, Brigham Young University, 2006
  • National Institutes of Health F32 NRSA, “Natural dynamics of attention in primate prefrontal cortex”, 2017-2018

    National Institutes of Health T32, “Cortical and subcortical mechanisms of reflexive orienting”, 2015-2017

    Fellow, Allen Brain Institute computational neuroscience (“The Dynamic Brain”) Summer Workshop, 2016

    Queen Elizabeth II Graduate Scholarship in Science and Technology, “The neural correlates of motor ambiguity”, 2012-2013

    Fellow, Computational Sensory-Motor Neuroscience (CoSMo) Summer School, 2012

    Canadian Institute of Health Research CGS Doctoral Research Award, “The effect of stimulus ambiguity on the selection of goal-directed actions”, 2009-2012

    Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) CGS Master’s Award, “The selection of grip posture while grasping objects at ambiguous orientations is susceptible to priming”, 2008-2009

LANGUAGES

  • Spanish

Publications

Glaser, JI, Wood, DK, Lawlor, PN, Segraves, MA, and Kording, KP (2019). From preliminary to definitive plans: two classes of neurons in frontal eye field. bioRxiv, 251835.

Wood, DK Chouinard, PA, Major, AJ, and Goodale, MA (2017). Sensitivity to biomechanical limitations during postural decision-making depends on the integrity of posterior superior parietal cortex. Cortex (97), 202-220.

Gu, C, Wood, DK, Gribble, PL, and Corneil, BD (2016). A trial-by-trial window into sensorimotor transformations in the human motor periphery. Journal of Neuroscience, 36 (31), 8273-8282.

Ramkumar P, Lawlor PN, Glaser JI, Wood DK, Segraves MA, Körding KP (2016). Feature-based attention and spatial selection in frontal eye fields during natural scene search. Journal of Neurophysiology, 116(3), 1328-1343.

Glaser JI, Wood DK (Co-First Author), Lawlor PN, Ramkumar P, Körding KP, Segraves MA (2016). Frontal eye field represents expected reward of saccades during natural scene search. Journal of Neurophysiology, 116 (2), 645-657.

Goonetilleke SC, Katz L, Wood, DK, Gu C, Huk A, Corneil BD (2015). Cross-species comparison of anticipatory and stimulus-driven neck muscle activity. Journal of Neurophysiology, 114(2), pp. 902-913.

Wood, DK, Gu C, Corneil BD, Gribble PL, Goodale MA (2015). Transient visual responses reset the phase of low-frequency oscillations in the skeletomotor periphery. European Journal of Neuroscience, 42(3), pp. 1919-1932. Chapman CS, Gallivan, JP, Wood, DK, Milne JL, Ansari D, Culham JC, Goodale MA (2014). Counting on the motor system: Rapid action planning reveals the format- and magnitude-dependent extraction of numerical quantity. Journal of Vision, 14, pp. 1-19.

Milne JL, Chapman CS, Gallivan, JP, Wood, DK, Culham JC, Goodale MA (2013). Object connectedness influences perceptual comparisons but not the planning or control of rapid reaches to multiple goals. Psychological Science, 24, pp. 1456-1465.

Wood, DK, Gallivan, JP, Chapman CS, Milne JL, Culham JC, Goodale MA (2011). Visual salience dominates early visuomotor competition in reaching behavior. Journal of Vision, 11, pp. 1-11.

Gallivan, JP, Chapman CS, Wood, DK, Milne JL, Culham JC, Ansari D, Goodale MA (2011). One to four, and nothing more: Non-conscious parallel object individuation in action. Psychological Science, 22, pp. 803-811.

Wood, DK, Goodale MA (2011). Selection of wrist posture in conditions of motor ambiguity. Experimental Brain Research, 208, pp. 607-620.

Chapman CS, Gallivan JP, Wood, DK, Milne JL, Culham JC, Goodale MA (2010). Short-term motor plasticity revealed in a visuomotor decision-making task. Behavioral Brain Research, 214, pp. 130-134.

Chapman CS, Gallivan JP, Wood, DK, Milne JL, Culham JC, Goodale MA (2010). Reaching for the unknown: Multiple target encoding and real-time decision-making in a rapid reach task. Cognition, 116, pp. 168-176.

Gallivan JP, Wood, DK (2009). Simultaneous encoding of potential grasp movements in macaque AIP. Journal of Neuroscience, 29, pp. 12031-12032.

Invited/Refereed Talks

Vision Sciences Society, St. Pete Beach, FL, 5/18

Gordon Research Seminar on Eye Movements, Lewiston, ME, 7/17

COSYNE (main meeting), Salt Lake City, 2/17.

Advanced Topics in Vision Seminar Series, Northwestern University, 10/15.

Gordon Research Conference on Eye Movements, Bentley University, 07/15.

Advanced Topics in Vision Seminar Series, Northwestern University, 01/15.

Seminar at Center for Perceptual Systems, UT Austin, 09/13.

Canadian Action and Perception Network (CAPNET) conference, Ad`ele, Quebec, 09/11.

Society for Neuroscience Nanosymposium (“Neural Control of Grasping”), Chicago,IL, 10/09.

Prior Experience

Postdoctoral Fellow, Neurobiology Department, Northwestern University, 2014-2019.

Researcher, Shirley Ryan AbilityLab (formerly Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago), 2014-2018

Product Reviewer, Marbles: The Brain Store, 2014-2016

Instructor/Course Coordinator, Psychology Department, Western University, 2007-2009

Additional Information

Peer Reviewer

Cerebral Cortex

Journal of Neuroscience

European Journal of Neuroscience

Scientific Reports

Journal of Neurophysiology

Experimental Brain Research

Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience

Current Eye Research

Psychonomic Bulletin and Review

Frontiers in Human Neuroscience

PLOS One

CREDENTIALS & PROFESSIONAL HONORS

  • Ph.D., Neuroscience, University of Western Ontario, Canada, 2014
  • M.Sc., Neuroscience, University of Western Ontario, Canada, 2010
  • B.A., Philosophy with Honors, Brigham Young University, 2006
  • National Institutes of Health F32 NRSA, “Natural dynamics of attention in primate prefrontal cortex”, 2017-2018

    National Institutes of Health T32, “Cortical and subcortical mechanisms of reflexive orienting”, 2015-2017

    Fellow, Allen Brain Institute computational neuroscience (“The Dynamic Brain”) Summer Workshop, 2016

    Queen Elizabeth II Graduate Scholarship in Science and Technology, “The neural correlates of motor ambiguity”, 2012-2013

    Fellow, Computational Sensory-Motor Neuroscience (CoSMo) Summer School, 2012

    Canadian Institute of Health Research CGS Doctoral Research Award, “The effect of stimulus ambiguity on the selection of goal-directed actions”, 2009-2012

    Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR) CGS Master’s Award, “The selection of grip posture while grasping objects at ambiguous orientations is susceptible to priming”, 2008-2009

LANGUAGES

  • Spanish